Multifamily Residential

Category Subtitle

406 Lorimer street

Project Manager/Designer: Naoyuki Shiiya

Completion Date: November 2005

Location: East Williamsburg

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Using art as a benchmark for the fa栤e, the building's varied materials and seemingly random patterning of windows gives it a "Mondrianic" appearance.Masonry and light gage steel construction, supplemented by Multi-height ceilings on the second and third floors give the apartments a loft-like feeling.The design started off with studies of volumes shifted and rearranged like building blocks. The task of assigning materials came next. Four different materials were used: glass and aluminum, which gave it the sharp and light look. Wood panels are used to balance the cool look of aluminum with the inherent warmth of dark wood. Gray stucco anchors the building on the site.The proportions and arrangement of the different materials allow them to coexist, and contribute to the articulation of the volumes, which is also achieved through required setbacks that create separation through depth.In many cases, the solid "cubes" were elevated or split to reveal glass behind, like gates that open, and which can be closed again at any moment.The result is a very dynamic structure that engages the eye to follow its volumes around the building.

395 South Second Street

Project Manager/Designer: Tamar Kisilevitz

Completion Date: November 2005

Location: East Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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The design of the building utilizes the flexibility of design with stucco, aluminum and glass in an innovative way. The massing is sensitive in that it bridges the adjacent 6-story building with a 2-story building in a stepped fashion. The second and third floor have two apartments each, while the first and fourth floor are full-floor duplexes. The 14 foot high ceilings, when combined with the angled rear walls and generous fenestration, create an ideal living environment in the city.

Bowery Hotel & Residence

Project Manager/Designer: Tamar Kisilevitz

Completion Date: December 2005

Location: NoHo, NYC

Visit: https://www.theboweryhotel.com/

The Bowery Tower plan consists of 90,000 square feet to be developed as residential, hospitality, commercial, and retail facilities. The commercial / retail components are located on the cellar, first and second floors, supporting a hotel building flanked by the ten story residential tower above. Additional uses include large roof terraces for the guests and resideNts and generous corridors and lobbies for the hotel portion. The basic principles that informed the design for the Bowery Tower were: -The creation of a focal point for a prominent intersection along New York's famed Bowery. -Tying this relatively large building into the vibrant neighborhood that surrounds and supports it. -Providing a variety of open spaces that maximize panoramic views of New York City. -Floor layouts that maintain a level of control and direction for future growth.

124 West 10th

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: January 2005

Location: Greenwich Village

Visit: http://blessoproperties.com/

The deluxe gut renovation of West 10th Street, a federal style townhouse, constituted the redistribution of spaces by dividing the building's interior into four spacious condominium units containing two duplexes, a single-floor unit and a penthouse. Three of the four units have spacious outdoor terraces, including the penthouse with its 900 square foot roof terrace. All four units feature two bedrooms, two wood burning fireplaces, and multiple skylights. Exposed brick walls, wood flooring and stone mantles convey an undeniable sense of home throughout each apartment, and the kitchen, which opens out to the main space, compliments it and yet stands its own. Special consideration was given to the interior design of kitchens and bathrooms. Integrating the functionality of a modern cook's kitchen within the confines of the urban apartment setting was a challenge. Each cabinet was planned to provide not only a variety storage options but also efficiency and maximum comfort, from spice racks on each side of the stove, a full height sliding pantry, to how a cabinet door will open. Stainless steel appliances and hardware are a perfect complement to the richness of the cabinetry and the sleekness of the glass and marble. Dark Wenge finishes give the spaces an anchoring quality while white marble and frosted glass offer a soothing and relaxing effect. A truly functional and beautiful space for the family to gather and enjoy, the open kitchens are an example of the intricate detailing of the interiors, with their Italian custom-crafted cabinetry, Carrara marble countertops and professional-grade appliances, uniting in the perfect marriage of aesthetics and convenience in this little gem in Manhattan's Greenwich Village.

63-67 Stagg Street

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: July 2005

Location: East Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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Finding the perfect mix of unit size and exterior style can make one project more successful over another. Constructed in an area of small multifamily mid-rise masonry buildings, this uniquely designed structure houses eight families in a condominium complex of three buildings. With two apartments on each of four floors, each unit has front and rear exposures. The concept for the plan layout was achieved by interlocking and reversing a mirrored geometry, which helped maximize the square footage per room in each apartment. This concept also fostered the undulating masonry facade pattern that is key to the clean look of the building. By expanding the height to the maximum limits permitted by the New York zoning resolution, this small building makes a big statement.

East 53rd Street

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: August 2005

Location: Upper East side-Manhattan

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325 East 53rd Street was designed to address the needs of the affluent homebuyer of Manhattan. Large family style apartments were required in a setting that would be a-typical to the traditional brownstone or walk-up building. An elevator was a mandate in order to give all the units outdoor recreation spaces, which could only be accommodated on the roof. The design for this building was determined by the context of, and the desire to create an urban statement. While cut stone was the original material to be used throughout the facade, it was later determined that a mixture of masonry would be added in order to make the building aesthetics more appealed. A tripartite facade contains a base, middle and top was used to keep a classically massed scheme. A combination of poured-in-place concrete and masonry block bearing walls was used due to its inherent strength, flexibility and ease of erection. All apartments contain individual heating systems, which employ separately zoned heating and cooling units. The final cost of construction was $2.8 million.

South 2nd Street

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: August 2005

Location: Williamsburg

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Bay Parkway

Project Manager/Designer: Ilana Kushnir

Completion Date: October 2005

Location: Bensonhurst

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Bensonhurst is an older area of Brooklyn, with solid housing and commercial strips. Many of its residents are first and second generation immigrants, who settled here for its excellent public schools, variety of housing styles and eclectic mix of commercial establishments. Bay Parkway and 65th Street have long been a stable residential intersection in the neighborhood. Sites for new buildings here are rare, and when one comes up it serves as a recipe for a successful development. The creation of a mixed-use building containing two levels and a cellar, with a commercial base and apartments above, ensured a successful economic mix within the building. Masonry, metal panels and curtain wall allowed the building facade to fit into the neighborhood, and make its own individual statement as well. Giving all the apartments outdoor space and large rooms, the waiting list for purchase grew while the building was still under construction. Its close proximity to public transportation and shopping areas added to the demand for this development.

Powers Street

Project Manager/Designer: Ronny Cohen-Piotraut

Completion Date: November 2005

Location: East Williamsburg

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Comprised of three existing two story buildings on three separate zoning lots, this new development created two ten family buildings that total in 11,000 square feet and appear as one building on a 75 foot by 100 foot parcel in East Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The construction cost was $2.2 million, at $200 per square foot. In an attempt to preserve the brick base of the buildings, a complex interlocking of old and new is achieved through the anchoring of the base of the previous building’s front and imposing an entirely new addition over it. Stucco and glass curtain wall played upon the elements to relieve what otherwise might have been a heavy looking top. A stone arched entry marks a special place on the building and, through color and simplicity of detailing, shifts the eye down toward street level. This created a unique façade, which uses the original material (brick) at the base of the building, and introduces a modern material throughout the two additional stories (stucco). Aluminum panels highlight the connection between brick and stucco, and articulate these meeting points. Double height windows with large single sheets of glass express the integrity of this articulation and act as tall, slender cuts that are inserted at the place where old and new meet. These windows provide the top floors with a fantastic view of the Manhattan skyline.

East 13th Street

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: July 2005

Location: Midwood

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Development in the Midwood section of Brooklyn has long since included the construction and alteration of many single and two family homes. Few if any small multi-family condominium projects have been developed since the majority of the community did not embrace this lifestyle. However, with the costs of land and homes at an all time high, the prospects of finding affordable housing has cultivated a demand for this building type. A 40 x 100 city lot is the staple for residential development, and if zoned for higher density it can take advantage of the Condominium Development trend. With twelve units in total, these two six-family four story walk up buildings share a common elevator and a continuous facade. Square footage is use to a maximum through efficient use of space, high ceilings and loft spaces, complimented by large expanses of glass and state of the art equipment. Each unit has access to outdoor recreation space or balconies. Metal paneling on the façade provides a traditional contextual relationship while introducing modern design touches. Parking garages are used as a buffer from the street and relieves some issues of parking off site. With the guidance of the quality housing program, 1014-1016 East 13th Street, fills the gap in the market, allowing entry level single or young couples or partly retired empty nester's a location with a bold architectural statement.

Leonard Street

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: June 2005

Location: Williamsburg

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Along with comprehensive re-zoning efforts, McCarren Park's redevelopment and revitalization has spawned the interest of the local development community. One example for this trend in the building at 415 Leonard Street. Built as a phased development, it will be one of the first structures erected under this new urban plan. Its modest seven story height emphasizes its presence through extensive finishes: two colors of masonry, metal panels and large windows, which give the project its distinctive character. Defining elements such as folded metal roofs break down the length of the facade and accentuate the individual apartments beneath them. Balcony projections and tall window elements contribute to the overall design motif, while cut stone bands and a contrasting brick help ground the structure to the prominent corner on which it sits. Ample below and on grade parking are just the beginning of the amenities which include state of the art appliances, Italian designed cabinetry, imported tiles and specialty hardwood flooring. A doorman, fitness center, meeting room and individual cellar storage spaces complete the hi-end character of this project.

Bedford Av.

Project Manager/Designer: Robert M. Scarano jr.

Completion Date: June 2005

Location: Williamsburg

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This mixed use building is part of a continuing effort stretch the boundaries of the trendy Williamsburg neighbor-hood south, toward the downtown Brooklyn area. A commercial first floor provides a visual base for the fifteen loft-style apartments above, which are organized in a variety of one and two bedroom configurations, each equipped with high ceilings. The massing of the building, its design and the materials used are an expression of the changes that the neighborhood is undergoing. Red brick was used to tie the building into its context. While some apartments enjoy large roof terraces, a public rear yard provides outdoor recreation space for residents.